interesting facts about anxiety

7 Interesting Facts About Anxiety + What You Can Do To Feel Better ASAP

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“Worrying is carrying tomorrow’s load with today’s strength- carrying two days at once. It is moving into tomorrow ahead of time. Worrying doesn’t empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength.” (Corrie Ten Boom)

Anxiety is the most common mental illness in the United States. It affects 40 million adults every year, and can have a variety of symptoms, as the facts below will indicate.

That is a really, really high number, and a lot of people sadly suffer in silence. I myself live with anxiety and it can be irritating at best and unbearable at worst.

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Chances are, you know at least 1 person with anxiety, if you do not suffer from it yourself. I personally know at least a dozen people in my close circle that suffer from some version of it. 1 in 5 people experience a mental health issue at some point in their lives, and many of them live with a form of anxiety.

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What Is Anxiety?

What is anxiety? And what causes it?

I thought Healthline put it really well. They make a great distinction between everyday “nerves” and an anxiety disorder that requires treatment.

It’s normal to feel anxious about moving to a new place, starting a new job, or taking a test. This type of anxiety is unpleasant, but it may motivate you to work harder and to do a better job. Ordinary anxiety is a feeling that comes and goes, but does not interfere with your everyday life. In the case of an anxiety disorder, the feeling of fear may be with you all the time. It is intense and sometimes debilitating. This type of anxiety may cause you to stop doing things you enjoy. In extreme cases, it may prevent you from entering an elevator, crossing the street, or even leaving your home. If left untreated, the anxiety will keep getting worse.

Everything You Need to Know About Anxiety

So, feeling nervous, or even slightly anxious can be a completely normal thing! We all get butterflies in our tummies sometimes, especially when we are experiencing major life changes. But there is a big difference between feeling nervous and having anxiety. Anxiety is thought to be caused by a combo of genetics, environment, and individual brain chemistry.

If it is impairing your everyday life, I would see a doctor ASAP.

Symptoms of anxiety

How do you know if you have anxiety? There are some really common symptoms you should be aware of.

  • Racing thoughts
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Irritability
  • Changes in sleep
  • Trouble concentrating

If you notice any of these symptoms in yourself or your loved one, I recommend making an appointment with a primary care physician, to make sure there is nothing significant going on. A PCP can point you in the direction of a good psychiatrist or therapist if that seems necessary.

Related post: What You Can Expect at Your First Therapy Appointment

anxiety, interesting facts about anxiety, facts about anxiety, mental health

7 Interesting Facts About Anxiety

It can be very lonely.

When a person lives with anxiety, it can feel very lonely. For one thing, when our brains are in a state of mental illness, they tend to tell us a lot of lies. One such lie is that our suffering is unique. While each person is different, we are far from having a unique struggle. There is always someone else out there going through something similar to you.

For another thing, anxiety makes socializing difficult. You feel as if leaving the house will make the world crash down around you. This is why a lot of people with anxiety shy away from social situations.

What can you do? Find a friend you can trust to talk to about the way you feel. See if they will come to you. Invite them over for a cup of coffee, and just commit to 30 minutes of small (or big) talk. Doing this whenever you feel up to it can help re-establish a sense of normalcy.

It can affect your sleep.

Anxiety can affect your sleep in a couple of ways. Maybe the most common is the fact that it can keep a person up at night. The racing thoughts. The irrationality. The racing heart. The sweaty palms. This can make it hard to fall asleep. Or, if you do fall asleep easily, it can make you wake up repeatedly.

Another way that anxiety can affect your sleep is by making you want to sleep too much. This is my particular issue. The only thing that helps my anxiety sometimes is to shut my mind off by going to sleep. This leads to people sleeping too much, which is bad for your circadian rhythms. That can, in turn, exacerbate any existing mental health conditions.

What can you do? There are a few things you can do to help get a better night’s sleep when you are suffering from anxiety. I would recommend unplugging from social media earlier in the evening. I would also recommend cutting yourself off from caffeine and alcohol earlier as well. You could also try meditation or breathing exercises.

It can make you irritable.

This is one of the ways my anxiety presents, so I definitely relate to this fact. When I am feeling anxious and worked up about something, I tend to get cranky. When my mind is racing with too many thoughts, it has a tendency to all come exploding out.

Irritability is a common symptom of anxiety, so if you find that you are overly cranky, do an emotional inventory. Are you overworked? Do you have a lot on your mind? It could be the case that you are suffering from anxiety. Make sure to check with your doctor to confirm this.

What can you do? I would definitely recommend some breathing exercises. Counting backwards from 10 or even 100. You could also try a grounding exercise. The most common example of this is thinking of 5 things you can see, 4 things you can touch, 3 things you can hear, 2 things you can smell, and 1 thing you can taste.

It can make your stomach ache.

A lot of people know that their anxiety is flaring up because they find themselves getting stomach aches or other digestive issues. This can also include the frequent need for urination.

One of my triggers of anxiety is long car rides (anything over 45 minutes). I always feel like I need to go to the bathroom or feel like I have a stomach ache. This is very common in children also. If they are anxious about going to school, they might think they are physically ill, and attempt to stay home.

What can you do? If you get triggered by travel like me, bring things to distract you. It is all about distracting your brain. I bring books in the car, or have games to play on my phone. Make sure to keep your mind moving so that it doesn’t latch on to whatever thoughts are making you anxious

anxiety, interesting facts about anxiety, facts about anxiety, mental health

It can start in childhood.

My anxiety started in 6th grade. At least, that is the earliest I can remember. I would have to go to the bathroom constantly during school. It was difficult to get up and get ready for the day without my mom singing a song made up of positive affirmations to me. I was teased and just didn’t want to go.

This is very common in children. They might complain of frequent stomach aches. If you have ruled out a bunch of biological causes, it is possible that they are suffering from anxiety. Take them to a psychiatrist that works with children to get the most accurate diagnosis possible.

It can affect your job.

Because of all the facts I already listed, it can make work difficult. Either you are so tired that your performance suffers, or you find yourself getting irritable with customers. Whatever the case, anxiety can certainly affect you professionally.

What can you do? I would talk to a trusted supervisor about how you have been feeling and have a candid talk about your recent performance. If you are honest about how you feel, they may have some company sponsored resources that can help.

It can last a lifetime.

This is probably the most difficult of the facts. There is no cure for anxiety. Unfortunately, when you suffer from it, it is usually there to stay. However, that doesn’t mean you cannot live a rich, fulfilling life.

What can you do? Connect yourself with a therapist. That is a relationship that will benefit you more than you might expect. It is helpful to have someone to talk it out with. They can also offer you coping strategies so that your days are more manageable.

Download a FREE PDF version of this HERE

Anxiety can be managed

If you follow all my advice above, I truly believe that anxiety can be managed. These facts might seem scary, but they do not have to be. If you are having a hard time, try journaling. This is a really positive experience when done consistently, so I recommend giving it a try. A lot of people see immediate relief!

I also recommend reading as much as you can, and learning about anxiety and what it actually is. There are so many great resources out there, so grab a few books, and get reading. Knowledge about the illness can bring a lot of comfort.

Be Calm: Proven Techniques to Stop Anxiety Now

Anxious for Nothing: Finding Calm in a Chaotic World

Dare: The New Way to End Anxiety and Stop Panic Attacks


Related Post: How to challenge negative thoughts- Yes, it’s possible!

I am also going to be expanding this post into a multi-part series, and turning it into an e-book for purchase. So, keep your eyes peeled.

There is hope.

I might have days that are very difficult, but I am still able to have a fulfilling life. I am married. We have two wonderful children. I am able to blog part-time. I work out a few days a week. Also, I have close relationships with my family.

Anxiety sucks, don’t get me wrong. It’s awful. But living with mental illness does not mean life is not, often, a beautiful thing.


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160 thoughts on “7 Interesting Facts About Anxiety + What You Can Do To Feel Better ASAP”

  1. I’ve been dealing with anxiety for a few years now, but until recently I started journaling. This has helped me so much, especially to put things in perspective and analyze the situation and my feelings better.

    This post is really great at outlining those symptoms we have when we’re feeling off and can’t quite figure out why. I recognize almost all of them and now that I look back at it, my anxiety probably started way in my early twenties.

    Thank you so much for sharing this.

    Have a lovely day.

    1. Thank you! I’m glad you found something that helps. Sometimes it helps to write down all your thoughts in a stream on consciousness style. Then you can read them aloud to yourself and see how “silly”/unhelpful they are.

  2. I don’t have anxiety on a clinical level so I find your articles extremely informative and great reminders of what others around me may be going through in a given moment. And how I can best help them.

  3. This is a great post. I suffered from anxiety for a long time. I have learned ways to manage it, however, so though I still have anxiety, I don’t say I suffer from it anymore. Meditation for me was the most helpful.

  4. My younger sister and I both have dealt with anxiety since childhood,, it’s shocking how both of us related to all of these points so closely!

  5. How I wish I did not identify so closely with this post. Anxiety is awful. There’s just no other word for it. I’m curious, though, do you find that journaling helps? I’ve heard that several times but I’m not even sure what I would write about.! Thank you for sharing this…so many people need to know that others can relate. It’s not a fun club to be in but there is support!

    1. I think it does if you commit to it! It’s hard to force yourself to start, but once you do and make it a habit, I think it’s helpful. So sorry you suffer from anxiety. Feel free to share if you found it helpful.

  6. I’m glad that I read this today. I had been speaking with my sister who is suffering from anxiety at night. I suggested learning some breathing techniques, but I will pass your post on to her too.

    1. Thanks! Mine is worse at night too. Is she empathic? I am reading a book on being empathic and it explains why sometimes anxiety is worse at night.

  7. Recently, as hard as it is to admit, I have been suffering from anxiety. I also tend to overthink and worry about the smallest of things. As I get older, I notice that what started as something minor has become major. Your blog has definitely made me realize that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Fantastic blog post. Thank you for sharing.

  8. Thanks for this post. Anxiety is never fun. I’ve had anxiety all my life, one that turned to a panic attack and landed me in the ER. It can be debilitating, even worse on stressful days. But as you said, there is hope. Having an understanding support network usually helps.

  9. I’ve had anxiety all my life. It’s gotten better as I’ve gotten older and learned how to manage it, but this is a great resource. Thank you!

  10. I love that you have spoken about writing your feelings, the negative journal. I had my husband keep a journal and all write about what he is grateful for. For many years my husband had many of these symptoms and also full on panic attacks. The anxiety put a strain on our relationship at times. I found as a partner to someone who has anxiety, it was important to be supportive but also have a healthy place to go and recharge. Thanks for sharing, I’ll be adding the book Dare to my 2020 reading list.

    1. Yes, my husband has some anxiety, but he is relatively neurotypical, and he definitely needs his space to get away. Just like I do! Thanks for reading. Let me know how you enjoy the book!

  11. It is amazing how common the condition is but so many choose to stay quiet about it. As a result, it stays untreated and people live with this throughout their lives. Hence the loneliness you mentioned.

    1. It’s funny, but with me personally and my bipolar/anxiety/fatigue mishmash, I was so nervous to begin talking about it. I had lost friends do to the disorders, and I thought I would lose more. But once I became more open about it, I find my social situation is better! I would hope that would be the case for everyone, but just saying, I can understand the fear! Thanks for reading.

    1. I’m sorry you have anxiety! Definitely try journaling and some of the other tips. I hope it help. Thanks for reading! Feel free to share.

  12. I absolutely agree. I’ve had anxiety as long as I can remember and it can affect you in so many ways. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was the best thing I ever started doing.

  13. I can totally relate. I am also struggling with anxiety and some days are so difficult. Even though I try to always put a smile on. Thank you for sharing the tips on how to cope. I will be coming back for more.

    1. Thank you so much for the kind words. I’m sorry you’ve been struggling. I hope things improve soon. Feel free to share if you found it helpful!

  14. Thank you so much for this post. Ever since having my daughter ive been having really bad anxiety that’s recently started affecting my everyday life. I’ve been working with a professional on it but I’m definitely going to check out these books too! Thanks again!!

    1. I’m sorry you’ve been going through that. The postpartum season is so hard! I hope you start to feel better soon. Feel free to share the post if you found it helpful.

  15. This post on facts about anxiety was informative. I never had a problem with anxiety out of the norm, but after my daughter was born, it amped up. I get anxious now in social situations and if I even think about trying anything new or going out alone. It gets to the point most of the time where I will talk myself out of things because I get so worried about things that may or may not happen. I like that exercise you shared to get grounded. Thank you for sharing. This is something that needs to be talked about.

  16. Such a great post. Really like your 7 facts. I think they’re really thorough and they are facts that people don’t necessarily know or take for granted.

  17. Postpartum anxiety warrior here. Thankfully medication has helped me manage it, but I do have flare-ups now and then that affects my ability to stay asleep. During my first experience with PPA, I didn’t know what it was. I was irritable, exhausted but unable to fall asleep, and had instances of rage. Thank you for sharing this helpful information!

  18. Yup, I can check all the boxes! I have had anxiety for as long as I can remember, although I wasn’t officially diagnosed until high school. It took a long time to learn how to cope and find a balance in my life. I used to have troubles getting in a car or even leaving the house in general. Back then I couldn’t imagine being where I am, someone who is high-functioning with this disorder. There is certainly hope!

    1. That is so great! I’m glad you are better now. I totally think everyone can find hope. It’s just a matter of trial and error

  19. I think I’ve had anxiety all my life – not necessarily as a chronic state, but persistent. When I started to take my little girl to play centre, at 3 years old… she would complain about her tummy hurting. Some days, I could convince her it was okay to go… other days I would turn around and drive her home again.
    But in being able to recognise what it was, I knew what “safe” felt like – and it wasn’t being dropped off kicking and screaming at play centre!
    Now, finishing up kindergarten, it might happen twice a year. She’s confident. She’s not anxious. And she trusts me when I tell her it’s safe!

  20. I can definitely attest to it starting in childhood. I see some many children who are anxious about school, test, their parents and their travel athletic teams.

  21. I really appreciate this post! I deal with anxiety and lately i feel like it’s been taking over my life. Or I guess I should say I’m allowing it to feel like it’s taking over my life. Thank you for the post! I’m definitely going to do the negative thoughts journal!

    1. Aww i’m sorry you’ve been going through that. I definitely know the feeling of being out of control!

      I hope my tips help. Feel free to share!

  22. I can relate so much to this post! Especially the irritability and racing thoughts. I used to think it was just my personality and not an actual legitimate issue. But a friend brought it up to me recently when talking about some issues and I started to look into it. Your post reminded me that anxiety is exactly what I am dealing with.. Thankfully not to the extent I’ve seen in others, but it is still there. I’m like you, distracting myself seems to really help. When I’m falling asleep I think about things I am grateful for. That way I’m not falling asleep to negative thoughts and it affects my sleep quality.

    1. Sorry I missed this! I need to update my WP notification settings! I’m so glad the post resonated with you. Hopefully you can get some answers.

  23. I love this post! I live with anxiety every day and I’ve done some things like journaling, meditating, and medicating. These were great tips and I can’t wait to try some of them.

  24. Hello, I suffered bad general anxiety. I would wake up in the middle of night trembling, sweating, and my mouth would dry out so bad I would dry heave! I found that exercise really helped me place that energy elsewhere. Thank you for shedding some light on the issue!

    1. Oh wow! That’s awful. Anxiety is truly the hardest part of my mental illness, I’ve found. I agree, exercise is very beneficial. Thanks for sharing.

  25. You forgot the part where it can affect your relationship. *Cry emoji* I started suffering from anxiety in 2017 after a few incidents happened that dramatically shifted my life. It took my partner a while to understand the sudden change and what I was going through.

    1. Thanks for saying so! I do what I can. I have lived with it for a long time and want to raise awareness in whatever way I can.

  26. I love the idea of a negative thought journal and think it might help some of my students. We see an increase in anxiety issues as we get closer to state testing each year. It breaks my heart to see these normally healthy students dissolve under the pressure of standardized tests.

  27. Great job! I absolutely love the information, truth and flow! I suffer from anxiety and often it feels like everything else. I manage much better now than I did years ago. Awareness and help are tremendous

  28. Anxiety is different for each of us and each breast have different ways to respond and challenge ourselves to defeat it. Thank you for very informative blog a lot of us need it going into this challenging

  29. I appreciate you writing this post! Anxiety is alarmingly common, yet it seems the majority of people still don’t understand it.
    I also suffer from anxiety and can relate to many of the things you shared. I appreciate that you mentioned the irritability because that’s been a symptom I’ve experienced when I’m especially anxious, and I had been feeling guilty about it. It’s nice to know that there’s actually a deeper cause behind it.

  30. I genuinely only found out recently that lack of concentration was a sign of anxiety! This post was really helpful and an really interesting read x

  31. I love that you explain each symptom, so that it would help someone to be more aware and empowered. Thank you for putting anxiety in the spotlight and for addressing misconceptions and best practices.

  32. A new friend struggles with anxiety and I struggle to know what to do to help, but I’m learning the best thing I can do is show up for her and support her. Thanks for this post – helps me understand those around me and myself!

  33. This was a great post. I’m glad that as a society we are becoming much more open with issues of mental health. That were not looking at it as a stigma but as something we all experience and can experience. That it’s okay and there is a solution! Thank you for this!

  34. Great post. A really important point about anxiety, sometimes it just never goes. So many folks are focused on getting rid of anxiety and that is not realistic for everyone. For years I beat myself up, for not being able to be anxiety-free. Then, I realized all that effort could be better spent, finding ways to live with the anxiety and lead a fulfilling life despite it. My anxiety is still huge, but now at least I have evidence to tell the anxiety it cannot hold me, prisoner!

  35. Great read! My 16 year old suffers from anxiety. We just got an IEP set up for her to make school a little more manageable. I will have to share this article with her, I think it would help tremendously for her to know others are dealing with it as well!

    1. Thank you so much! I’m sorry she goes through that. I had a lot of anxiety at school so i think it’s great that you are trying to help!

  36. Anxiety is something I think everyone suffers from, different levels of course. I never even thought to link it to stomach issues though, it makes total sense that it would.

  37. Thank you for offering your help to the many people that suffer from anxiety and do not have the answers and solutions that you have found. Sharing is caring! =) I especially enjoyed reading about the sleep issues and want to find out more on that.

  38. Ugh, anxiety is the worst. I feel most of what you mention above, but most of all, it keeps me from sleeping. I have to wait until I’m deadly tired before hitting the sack, otherwise my anxiety will keep me up half the night. One of my goals for the new year is to find a therapist and talk over some coping mechanisms. Thanks for this post and for bringing light to anxiety.

  39. I just sent this post over to my husband. I have dealt with anxiety my whole life-debilitating reclusive anxiety and he has a difficult time understanding but he WANTS to, and this post is perfect. Thank you!

  40. I’m glad you are showing that you can still have full like with anxiety. A guest blogger wrote a post a journaling prompts tmfor anxiety. So glad you guys can help others X

  41. I actually speak a lot about my own personal anxiety on my page! But it always is so nice to read it from another person’s perspective! It is such a weird and harsh thing to live with. Thanks for your post! Lovely.

  42. Anxiety and depression are such heavy topics typically but is needed to be talked about. I love how you explained all of the hard truths in a way people can understand and relate to. Great article

  43. “Anxiety can affect your sleep in a couple of ways.”
    The the proper amount of sleep is SO important! It is amazing how too much or too little can throw your life out of order. I agree, being anxious DOES negatively disturb your sleep.
    Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  44. I developed postpartum anxiety about 10 months after my first child was born. Luckily it was moderate and I was able to overcome a lot of the symptoms. I’m still dealing with it occasionally a few years later, but I’ve learned a lot of ways to manage it!

  45. I have experienced anxiety so bad at times I would force myself to leave the house to get toilet paper but I would end up feeling so anxious, I would drive around feeling lost because I couldn’t decide if I should just go to the store or go back home. Thanks for spreading awareness and solutions! aloha

  46. So nice to hear someone “mythbusting” about anxiety. Particularly about the stomach issues related to it. People often dismiss anxiety as something we all have and just have to manage. But it can be so isolating and it doesn’t just go away. It can be managed but it can’t be erased

  47. I remember my very first anxiety attack, it was so consuming and overwhelming, I freaked out because I didn’t know what was happening and thought I was going to die. It sounds funny to say it now because I sound so dramatic but it’s not funny and it’s a very real and scary feeling. I’ve gotten better at managing my anxiety which is helpful so I can help guide my daughters if they go through the same thing in their lives. Thanks for sharing!

    1. You’re welcome! I have been with someone I’m very close to and I had the same experience. I called 911 because I thought they were having a heart attack or stroke. It’s so scary. Thanks for reading!

  48. Great post. You always have such great info. I suffer from anxiety as do several of my children. My doctor told them that it was a hereditary tendency due to genetics. :/ I wish I had given them better genes. I am trying to set a good example of finding good coping tips so I can teach them to manage it better.

  49. This is such an important topic. As someone with anxiety who is also a parent and grandparent to kids who have anxiety I wish there was more awareness. My son’s anxiety was so bad at his checkup one day the doctor sent him over for a heart exam because his heart rate was through the roof.. Scary stuff. But so many people don’t understand. 🙁

  50. Excellent post and full of great advice. Thank you for sharing your journey with us and using it to bring awareness and advice to others.Anxiety can affect people at different stages of their lifes.

  51. karenonlineblogbusinesshelp

    Thank you for this post. I have a family member with very high anxiety. This helps me understand things a little bit better.

  52. Not only can it last a lifetime, it can creep up on you when you’re well into your adult years, despite no signs of it in earlier life. Now that’s a whole pile of fun to get used to.

  53. This hit the nail right on the head when describing the difficulties of anxiety. Discovering why I feel the way I feel is such a relief when trying to understand my anxiety. It makes managing it a little easier. Thank you for sharing.

  54. When I was hit with anxiety, I wasn’t able to get some sleep, stomach problems and I shut off myself away from people. It was hard but your tips (something I did too!) really can help. Thank you for sharing this!

  55. Anxiety is awful and because I go into fight/flight/freeze my stomach decides to completely empty itself as well as ache so I’m ready to run from the sabre toothed tiger :-/
    It’s definitely not a sexy condition!

    I’m glad to hear that you are managing your anxiety well and have found things that help.

  56. Such a good post! These are all facts about anxiety that I wish everyone knew. Especially the irritability and the stomach issues one. When I’m really anxious, I’m an irritable mess that people DO NOT want to be around, haha. And the stomach issues one can be really rough. When I was first diagnosed with anxiety, I was soon after diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome, and it’s been a constant, along with my anxiety, for years now. Doctors keep telling me that once I get my anxiety under control, my IBS will go away, but my IBS makes me anxious! It’s a terrible vicious circle. But thank you for this awesome post! I hope it helps more people and your last point, that anxiety can be managed is such a ray of hope at the end.

    Emily | https://www.thatweirdgirllife.com

  57. It’s so good to share these points for people who are unaware.

    I suffered with anxiety for years and although it’s been better lately I remember how awful it is.
    The physical symptoms can be so bad including stomach cramps and sweating, but once you’ve found the best ways to help you manage it, it really can improve.

    Love Lozza xo
    http://girlygabble.com

  58. Wonderful post on anxiety, it took me awhile to figure out why I was always feeling so anxious. I figured let me google how I am feeling and google said it was anxiety and it usually self diagnosed because who knows your body better than you but yourself. Also, after reading your post I know my anxiety start back in school. It goes all the way back to my mind building up that anticipation when I knew the teacher would call on me and then I become so flustered and shaken lol wow. Great post!

  59. I thoroughly enjoyed reading your article. I just recently did an article of how to overcome social anxiety using cognitive behavior techniques. I personally suffer from performance anxiety from time to time when I’m preparing for a motivational speech I have to present. Come check my blog out too if interested. Made You Smile Back

  60. Such an important post and I relate heavily to a lot of these, especially irritability and stomach stuff! I don’t have a very good temper at the best of times but you can usually tell when my anxiety is bad as my fuse gets even shorter. I’ve also had stomach issues since I was a kid and it’s such a vicious cycle with anxiety it’s hard to know what triggers what. Thank you for sharing ?

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